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Dancing at the End of the World 2

Friday October 25th / 7pm / Betty Pease Theater (Studio A)

In this evening of performances Michael J. Morris and Charli Brissey will present two current projects, Elemental Rites at the End of the World and Agua Viva: Choreographies of Water. Both pieces address relationships and affect between the human and the nonhuman, including the intersections of our daily ecosystems with movement scales of the astrological, the aquatic, the unimagined, and the invisible.

**THIS EVENT IS FOLLOWED BY FOOD AND A DANCE PARTY WITH DJ MEDUSA (AKA ELI)**

 

agua viva

Choreography and Performance by Charli Brissey

run time: 35 minutes

 Brissey will present a solo iteration of their current multi-year research project, which turns to the choreography of oceans, natural water systems, and the deep-sea floor as potentially radical sites for reimagining our terrestrial future(s). Emerging through performance, video, field work, sound design, and experimental writing, this project questions what gets identified as “technology” and the social, political, and ecological consequences of engaging with these systems. Blending queer science "fiction" and personal anecdote, Brissey takes on impossible tasks and unidentifiable embodiments to move closer towards that which feels unimaginable. 

Elemental Rites at the End of the World

Choreography and Performance by Michael J. Morris

run time: 30 minutes

Elemental Rites at the End of the World is a minimalist performance-ritual through which I ask how to engage the more-than-human as sacred during times of climate crisis and the sixth great extinction. It was premiered at the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, OH, on March 1, 2019, and was then presented as part of an exhibition entitled Southern Queer Magic at the Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge in Baton Rouge, LA, on June 7, 2019. The piece is partially in response to and in dialogue with Alexis Pauline Gumbs’ book M Archive: After the End of the World and adrienne maree brown and Autumn Brown’s podcast How to Survive the End of the World. I am grateful for their work and the opportunity to direct your attention toward it.